Stuff I wanted to be able to find
Are there any fics where peter gets shot/seriously hurt and wade needs to save him?
Anonymous
thecaptainsoiree:

thecaptainsoiree:

So I wrote a fem!Dean/Cas pastry chef AU, because why the hell not?

Risen
Rating: Explicit
Pairings: rule63!Dean/Castiel, background Sam/Jess and Benny/Andrea
Wordcount: ~40k (29k published so far)
Summary: When she hangs the help wanted sign in the front window of her cafe, the last thing Deanna expects is to end up employing an inexperienced, socially inept ex-actuary as her new pastry cook. WIP.

♥♥♥

In case anyone has been following, I’ve updated Risen! Chapter five is here. Hope y’all enjoy :)

thecaptainsoiree:

thecaptainsoiree:

So I wrote a fem!Dean/Cas pastry chef AU, because why the hell not?

Risen

Rating: Explicit

Pairings: rule63!Dean/Castiel, background Sam/Jess and Benny/Andrea

Wordcount: ~40k (29k published so far)

Summary: When she hangs the help wanted sign in the front window of her cafe, the last thing Deanna expects is to end up employing an inexperienced, socially inept ex-actuary as her new pastry cook. WIP.

♥♥♥

In case anyone has been following, I’ve updated Risen! Chapter five is here. Hope y’all enjoy :)

glutenfreewaffles:

PS here are some stats about Steve from his exhibit in Disneyland, in case anyone would like it for writing references.

glutenfreewaffles:

PS here are some stats about Steve from his exhibit in Disneyland, in case anyone would like it for writing references.

thesilvereye:

If you would like to request a tutorial, you can do so on this post over here!
Eye Coloring Tutorial by me | Other Eye Tutorials: 1 2 3 | My Resource list for Faces and Heads

kawaiistomp:

Pink tapioca ~ (photo credit and recipe in source link)

kawaiistomp:

Pink tapioca ~ (photo credit and recipe in source link)

tmirai:

fuckingmonsters:

figuring out complicated designs in perspective doesnt have to make you mad so here is good tips to keep in mind. can be used for all kinds of things

Bloody brilliant. Thank you!

foervraengd:

andworldbuildingtoo:

foervraengd:

Brown eyes are beautiful and pretty and we should draw them more often!
btw here are some nice words to describe brown eyes:
golden, amber, burnt sienna, raw umber, mahogany

You forgot sable, cinnamon, copper, seal brown, oak, caramel, dun, sepia, chestnut, taupe, ermine and bistre.

ooooh thank you for adding more words! Anglish isn’t my first language so some of the words are actually new to me!

foervraengd:

andworldbuildingtoo:

foervraengd:

Brown eyes are beautiful and pretty and we should draw them more often!

btw here are some nice words to describe brown eyes:

golden, amber, burnt sienna, raw umber, mahogany

You forgot sable, cinnamon, copper, seal brown, oak, caramel, dun, sepia, chestnut, taupe, ermine and bistre.

ooooh thank you for adding more words! Anglish isn’t my first language so some of the words are actually new to me!

Why what you do doesn’t seem important, but actually is

blue-author:

youneedacat:

soilrockslove:

mars-maggie:

When I was in college, I had a wonderful mentor/professor who helped me learn lessons that keep being relevant as I go through life—which, if you ask me, is the tell-tale sign that he was a great professor.

One of those lessons was that it could be almost impossible to establish self-worth, and to recognize self-acheivement. After we’ve learned how to do something—ANYTHING—really well, it seems almost like second nature for us to do it. Even if we’re producing quality work, we look at it and think ‘well, sure this turned out well but anyone out there could have done it if they put the time in.’ We forget that WE are the ones that put the time in to learn the skill, and that WE are the ones who now have something special for it.

Here’s an example:

This professor told me about a time when he was at a conference giving a talk. After he was done with his seminar (which was probably about something awesome like chaotic oscillators) he went on to listen to other professors and industry professionals give their talks. There was one he was sitting on, thinking to himself ‘WOW this guy is cool. Here he is building a genetic search engine (or some other incredible topic) while I’m just dorking around with chaotic oscillators.’ but then, after the talk, my professor went up to him. He wanted to tell him how neat he found the subject and the guys research… And when he got up there, the guy went ‘OH WOW you are that professor with the chaotic oscillators! I saw your seminar and I was so excited by it! You’re really doing something incredible while I’m just dorking around with genetic search engines.’ And thats when my professor realized that JUST BECAUSE THINGS SEEM COMMON TO US DOESN’T MEAN THAT THEY ARE COMMON. Our skills, our lessons, and our experiences are unique to each of us, we just are looking at them through the fogged glass of ‘been there, done that.’ Others won’t be looking at them through that same glass.

If you ever see artwork and say ‘wow I wish mine was that good,’ or read a story and say ‘gee I wish that I could write like that,’ you have to also remember that there is probably someone out there saying the same exact thing about your work to themselves. It might even be the exact same person who you’re envying.

Please never forget that your experiences have made your own work into something valuable. YOU have put the time into it. YOU have something unique. YOU have something that it would take somebody else at least as long to duplicate, and it would still never come out the same way that you do it.

We fixate so often on comparing ourselves to other people, but we judge ourselves the most unfairly. We look at what they have, and we fret about what we don’t have, and we forget that we aren’t defined by what we don’t have.

Your work is important, and it is only going to get more important from here.

All of this.

Also, part of getting better at something is seeing new ways you cn make it better.  That sight is part of the making.  So no matter how helpful or skilled you are being, you will always see little things that are “off”.  So don’t judge yourself too harshly based on them.

I think they’ve actually studied how people see their skills.  And people who are bad at things tend to overestimate their skills by a lot.  People who are good at things tend to underestimate their skills.  There’s reasons for both.

It’s called the Dunning-Kruger effect.

As your competence in an area increases, your ability to recognize errors and see where you can improve also increases.

It’s the practical version of the Socratic wisdom that the only true knowledge is knowing that you know nothing.

vestien:

I’ve been trying to figure out how to answer this, but I am really bad at explanations… so I just drew up some eyes and colored them. 
M-most days I color a whole hell of a lot lazier than this tho (i got a bit too into the coloring part esp cause its such a small section ;; ) but yeah.  this is just how I draw them.  its fun to try different shapes as well :)

best wishes on all your eyeball drawing adventures!

Vɪᴅᴇᴏ Gᴀᴍᴇs ᴄʜᴀʀᴀᴄᴛᴇʀs ʙʏ MBTI ᴀɴᴅ KTS ᴛʏᴘᴇ:

The Guardian Temperament [SJ’S]

Also known as the security seeker type, guardians individuals are the balance of our society - they have a stabilizing effect essencial to humanity. They need to know where they stand on a group - if he is the leader, follower or individualist. Guardians are expected to take responsability, they usually shoulder all the load that has to be done and are pride of it. They have natural skills when we talk about managing goods and services, guardians use all of it to run things smoothly. Pratical and down-to-earth, they follow the rules and cooperate with others, they value discipline and teamwork too. Concerned about the people they care about and their institutions, people with this temperament trust authority and security above all. Their greatest strength is dependability.